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Delinquency Cases Involving Hispanic Youth, 2013

NCJ Number
249915
Date Published
Author(s)
Sarah Hockenberry and Charles Puzzanchera
Publication Series
OJJDP National Report Series
Annotation
Although the data presented in this report are not national estimates, this bulletin presents data on where disproportionate numbers of Hispanic youth are involved at various decision points within the juvenile justice system, so as to guide reform efforts intended to reduce disparities and ensure that Hispanic youth receive developmentally appropriate services.
Abstract
In 2013, compared with White youth, Hispanic youth were 20 percent more likely to be referred to juvenile court and equally as likely to have their case handled formally. Once adjudicated, Hispanic youth were as likely as White youth to be placed on probation, but were 30 percent more likely to be ordered to out-of-home placement. Hispanic youth were 30 percent more likely than Black youth to be adjudicated delinquent in 2013. Hispanic youth were more likely than Black youth to be placed on probation, but were as likely to be ordered to out-of-home placement. Hispanic youth were less likely than Black youth to be waived to criminal court for case processing. Across offense categories, Hispanic youth were more likely than White youth or Black youth to be adjudicated delinquent. The U.S. Justice Department’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency prevention developed the Relative Rate Index (RRI) as a tool to identify and measure disparities across the stages of the juvenile justice system by comparing rates of juvenile justice contact experienced by different groups of youth. Data used were for 26 States and the District of Columbia from the National Juvenile Court Data Archive 2006-2013. The Archive houses the automated records of cases handled by courts with juvenile jurisdiction. 7 tables and 8 figures
Date Created: September 30, 2019