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Court Performance Measures in Child Abuse and Neglect Cases: Guide to Judicial Workload Assessment

NCJ Number
223571
Date Published
April 2009
Length
72 pages
Author(s)
Mark Hardin J.D.; Ying-Ying Yuan Ph.D.; Judith Larsen J.D.; Sophia I. Gatowski Ph.D.; Dawn Marie Rubio J.D.
Agencies
OJJDP
Publication Type
Policy/Procedure Handbook/Manual
Grant Number(s)
2003-JS-FX-K008, 90XW0008
Annotation
This volume of the toolkit presents a method for obtaining data on judicial workloads in abuse and neglect cases which includes an assessment of what is required for best practice in these cases, discusses different approaches to workload analysis, and provides tools for conducting analyses.
Abstract
The assessment guide begins with an introduction that examines (1) how new legal duties have increased the responsibilities of judges in dependency cases, (2) why it is important for workload analysis in child abuse and neglect cases to consider the amount of time it takes judges to comply with legal requirements and practice standards, (3) what the sources of law and practice standards in child abuse and neglect proceedings are, and (4) what the goals are that shape the preparation of these workload analysis tools. The next two chapters discuss two main tools used in workload analysis: time log data collection and observation of courtrooms. A fourth chapter discusses the use of Delphi process to build consensus among dependency court judges as to the optimal length of time needed for both in-court and out-of-court activities. A concluding chapter suggests implementation strategies to adapt these tools to specific situations. This volume is one of five in a toolkit, supported by the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), designed and tested to provide practical and comprehensive guidance to the critical task of measuring court performance in child abuse and neglect cases. Appendixes A-E and observations
Date Created: January 8, 2009