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State Relations and Assistance Division National Training Conference

September 24-26, 2019 | Kansas City, MO
Description
State Relations and Assistance Division National Training Conference
OJJDP's State Relations and Assistance Division hosts National Training Conference in Kansas City, MO. (View larger image.)

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention held its 2019 State Relations and Assistance Division (SRAD) National Training Conference in Kansas City, MO, from September 24 to 26, 2019. SRAD oversees distribution of funds under the Formula Grants program.

The event offered a wealth of information and resources to help states and territories prevent delinquency and improve the juvenile justice system. OJJDP provided critical training to designated state agency representatives, State Advisory Group (SAG) members, and Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice (FACJJ) members. 

State Relations and Assistance Division training session
SRAD National Training Conference Breakout Session (View larger image.)

Approximately 200 participants engaged in interactive discussions, panels, and workshops to enhance implementation of OJJDP's Title II Formula Grants program and support compliance with the core requirements of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JJDP Act) as amended by the Juvenile Justice Reform Act of 2018 (JJRA). The amendments became effective in fiscal year 2020 (October 1, 2019).

There were also presentations from the Departments of Health and Human Services and Education on youth services for justice involved youth, funding opportunities, and available resources.

Video: Conference Sessions

  • Caren Harp, OJJDP Administrator, welcomes attendees and helps state representatives understand the new requirements under the Juvenile Justice Reform Act.
  • A discussion of the JJRA's new requirements regarding youth waived to adult court.
  • A walk-through of the updated features and content of the Office's online Compliance Monitoring Tool.
  • A presentation on OJJDP's redesigned website.
  • A discussion with youth members of state advisory groups about the importance of youth engagement in juvenile justice.
  • A question-and-answer session with members of the Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice.
  • An interview with FACJJ subcommittee members, in which they discuss their work and priorities. The FACJJ subcommittees are Educating the Field, Facilitating Compliance With the Juvenile Justice Reform Act, and Special Topics.
  • An update of the Government Accountability Office's audits of OJJDP and its grantees, as mandated by the Juvenile Justice Reform Act.
  • Effective Monitoring Systems: An OJJDP Compliance Monitor explains the Juvenile Justice Reform Act mandate that states must have an "effective" system of monitoring compliance with the core requirements of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act. States were previously required to have an "adequate" monitoring system.
  • Juvenile Justice Resources: A representative from the Department of Health and Human Services' Family and Youth Services Bureau highlights relevant resources for stakeholders.
  • Partner Resources and Cross-System Collaboration: Officials from the Department of Education (DOE) discuss the objectives of The Prevention and Intervention Programs for Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent or At Risk (Title I, Part D of the Every Student Succeeds Act); opportunities for collaboration between justice and education professionals; and the DOE resources.
  • Tribal Youth Leadership: A representative from the OJJDP-supported United National Indian Tribal Youth, Inc. (UNITY) discusses the organization's work to empower tribal youth.
  • Engaging Tribal Entities: A representative from Oklahoma's Office of Juvenile Affairs highlights the ways in which tribes can use Title II funding from OJJDP to improve outcomes for youth.
  • Needs of U.S. Territories: The U.S. Virgin Islands' state advisory group vice chair discusses the territory's juvenile justice and delinquency needs. 


Formula Grants Eligibility and Compliance 

To be eligible to receive a formula grant, a state must designate one agency to prepare and administer a comprehensive 3-year Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention plan, establish a SAG appointed by the governor or other chief executive officer to provide policy direction, participate in preparing and administering the Formula Grants program plan, and commit to achieve and maintain compliance with the four core requirements of the JJDP Act.

Compliance with the JJDP Act and its four core requirements is a complex, ongoing process of assessment, evaluation, and data gathering. Following are the four core requirements of the JJDP Act:

  • Deinstitutionalization of status offenders.
  • Removal of juveniles from adult jails and detention facilities.
  • Separation of juveniles from adults in secure facilities.
  • Reduction of disproportionate minority contact within the juvenile justice system.

OJJDP Resources

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