U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government, Department of Justice.

Dot gov

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

Https

The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice Annual Report 2004

NCJ Number
207500
Date Published
Author(s)
Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice
Annotation
This annual report to the President and the U.S. Congress reflects some critical juvenile justice concerns and issues facing the United States today and recommendations.
Abstract
The Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice (FACJJ) is an advisory body established by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (JJDP) Act of 1974. FACJJ provides States an opportunity to have direct input into the Federal policy development and budge processes. FACJJ held its first meeting in 2004. The advisory committee’s mandated responsibilities include preparing two annual reports. The first provides advice to the President and Congress about State perspectives on the operation of OJJDP and on Federal legislation pertaining to juvenile justice and delinquency prevention. This first annual report reflects concerns and issues identified by governors and those working on the front lines with juveniles as being the most in need of immediate attention. It offers an overview of the progress that has been made in addressing juvenile justice and delinquency prevention over the past 3 decades and outlines some critical issues facing today’s juvenile justice practitioners and policymakers. The report contains 13 recommendations from FACJJ on steps that need to be taken to improve the juvenile justice system, prevent juvenile delinquency and violence, intervene when juvenile delinquency and violence occur, and provide practitioners with the programs and tools they need to help youth avoid future delinquency and violence. References
Date Created: August 12, 2014