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The AMBER Advocate, Volume 5, Issue 3, December 2011

NCJ Number
237248
Date Published
Author(s)
AMBER Alert Training & Technical Assistance Program
Annotation
This issue features six articles which provide nationwide and international examples of AMBER Alert success stories.
Abstract
This issue features six articles: 1)Frontlines: Four-State-AMBER Alert which describes how relationships became critical when a four-State AMBER Alert occurred; 2) Beyond AMBER discusses how States expand the use of alerts for other dangers, such as Texas’ first Blue Alert for an officer who had been abducted by another officer; 3) Profile: Dennis Lyle discusses an Illinois Broadcaster who helped to create a State AMBER Alert program in Illinois; 4) Amber Alert International which includes articles on how Mexican law enforcement officers detained more than 1,000 men and women in July during an investigation of sexual exploitation and human trafficking in Juarez, Mexico, and how the Office of the Chihuahua Attorney General launched a campaign to find missing women and girls. Canadian training programs consider the role of social media when an AMBER Alert occurs, how Ontario hosted a seminar on child abductions, and how an AMBER Alert helped to find a disabled child in Greece; 5) AMBER Alert Collaboration Portal describes the AMBER Alert Training and Technical Criminal Justice Collaboration Portal which provides program information, announcements, calendar updates, document downloads, discussion boards, and more; and 6) Odds & Ends which describes how New York created a Gold Alert, how West Virginia launched an endangered missing advisory after a toddler went missing, how Utah held the State’s largest AMBER Alert training, how Arizona held child abduction drill, how Tulsa tested a child abduction recovery plan; and how motorcyclists raised $18,000 for Minnesota AMBER Alert Program. This issue also includes Letters to the Advocate.
Date Created: December 3, 2019