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2011 AMBER Alert Report: Analysis of AMBER Alert Cases in 2011

NCJ Number
238756
Date Published
Author(s)
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children
Annotation
This report from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children presents an update on AMBER Alert Cases in 2011.
Abstract
Highlights on AMBER (America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response) Alert cases in 2011 include the following: between January 1 and December 31, 158 AMBER Alerts involving 197 children were issued by law enforcement agencies; 144 cases resulted in recovery and 5 children were recovered deceased; 47 percent of alerts were issued state-/territorial-wide, 49 percent were regional alerts, and 4 percent were local alerts; California issued the most alerts, 10 percent, followed by Michigan and Texas, 9 percent each; 51 percent of cases were family abductions (FAs), 35 percent were non-family abductions (NFAs), 13 percent were lost, injured, or otherwise missing (LIMs), and 1 percent were classified as endangered runaways (ERs); and the highest number of FAs occurred in July while the highest number of NFAs occurred in August. This report was prepared by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and contains information on the AMBER Alert Cases that occurred during 2011. The AMBER Alert program is a voluntary partnership between law enforcement agencies, broadcasters, and transportation agencies to activate an urgent bulleting in the most serious child-abduction cases. Data are reported on cases activated in multiple, regional, and local areas; on one of four types of cases (FAs, NFAs, LIMs, and ERs), whether the case is a real abduction or a hoax, and the resolution of the case. Tables and figures
Date Created: December 3, 2019