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OJJDP Juvenile Detention Reform 2014

Award Information

Award #
2014-MU-FX-0005
Location
Congressional District
Status
Closed
Funding First Awarded
2014
Total funding (to date)
$505,000

Description of original award (Fiscal Year 2014, $230,000)

OJJDP's Juvenile Justice System Improvement Grants program was established to provide grants and cooperative agreements to organizations that provide programs and services critical to the mission of OJJDP, and organizations that OJJDP has selected for funds in prior years. This program will be authorized by an Act appropriating funds for the Department of Justice.

The purpose of this project is to continue work to reduce the unnecessary and inappropriate use of secure detention in sites over a multi-year period. The W. Haywood Burns Institute (BI) will continue to provide extensive technical assistance on detention reform to the statewide sites of Kansas, Wyoming, Arizona and New York as well as the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians. This proposal is for a forth year of federal funding for detention reform. The population to be served is youth who are held in secure detention but who could be safely released to parents or guardians or to community-based programs. NCA/NCF

OJJDP's Juvenile Justice System Improvement Grants program was established to provide grants and cooperative agreements to organizations that provide programs and services critical to the mission of OJJDP, and organizations that OJJDP has selected for funds in prior years. This program will be authorized by an Act appropriating funds for the Department of Justice.

The Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI) was started in 1992 by the Annie E. Casey Foundation (AECF) to further the foundation's mission to ensure that all youth involved in the juvenile justice system have opportunities to develop into healthy, productive adults. JDAI focuses on the juvenile detention component of the juvenile justice system because youth are often unnecessarily or inappropriately detained at great expense, with long-lasting negative consequences for both public safety and youth development. The purpose of this project is to partner with the AECF and the Haywood Burns Institute to continue to support the implementation of JDAI in Indian Country and to expand the scope of the work into additional sites in New Mexico. NCA/NCF

This program furthers the Department's mission by providing grants and cooperative agreements for training and technical assistance to organizations that OJJDP designates.

For over twenty years the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s (AECF) Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI) has worked in jurisdictions across the country to reduce the overreliance on secure detention and to create a fairer, equitable, more efficient and effective youth justice system. At the end of 2013, JDAI reached over one-fourth of the total U.S. population and was operating in more than 250 counties and one tribe, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, spread across 39 states and the District of Columbia. In order to continue the expansion of these successful reforms to Indian Country, this grant continue the existing work with the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians and The Pueblo of Isleta (New Mexico).
NCA/NCF

Date Created: September 21, 2014