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FY 2003 OJJDP DISCRETIONARY CONTINUATION PROGRAMS- RESEARCH,EVALUATION AND STATISTICS

Award Information

Award #
2000-TY-FX-K001
Location
Awardee County
Ingham
Congressional District
Status
Closed
Funding First Awarded
2000
Total funding (to date)
$1,669,217

Description of original award (Fiscal Year 2000, $550,000)

Project Summary for 2000-TY-FX-K001

The Tribal Youth Program (TYP) provides funds directly to tribal communities to develop programs that help prevent and control juvenile delinquency, including violent crime, and improve tribal juvenile justice systems. The Michigan Public Health Institute (MPHI) in Okemos, MI, in partnership with the Native American Institute at Michigan State University in Lansing, is assisting five tribes in developing capacity to evaluate the programs they have implemented with their TYP funds through the implementation of the Evaluation Facilitation for the Tribal Youth Program. Each site has assembled a program assessment team (PAT) that includes local stakeholders in developing and carrying out data collection, analysis activities, and evaluation reports. MPHI provides training and technical assistance to PATs to facilitate evaluations of their tribal programs. MPHI has analyzed each site's juvenile and tribal justice systems and TYP activities within those systems, and analyzed the relationships between the tribal government and county, State, and Federal government agencies as they relate to juvenile justice responsibilities and operations. The five tribes participation in the Evaluation Facilitation of the Tribal Youth Program are Navajo Nation, Eastern Aleutian Tribes, Inc., Puyallup Tribes of Indians, Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, and Hannahville Indian Community.

CA/NCF

Project Summary for 2000-TY-FX-K001

The Tribal Youth Program (TYP) provides funds directly to tribal communities to develop programs that help prevent and control juvenile delinquency, including violent crime, and improve tribal juvenile justice systems. The Michigan Public Health Institute (MPHI) in Okemos, MI, in partnership with the Native American Institute at Michigan State University in Lansing, is assisting five tribes in developing capacity to evaluate the programs they have implemented with their TYP funds through the implementation of the Evaluation Facilitation for the Tribal Youth Program. Each site has assembled a program assessment team (PAT) that includes local stakeholders in developing and carrying out data collection, analysis activities, and evaluation reports. MPHI provides training and technical assistance to PATs to facilitate evaluations of their tribal programs. MPHI has analyzed each site's juvenile and tribal justice systems and TYP activities within those systems, and analyzed the relationships between the tribal government and county, State, and Federal government agencies as they relate to juvenile justice responsibilities and operations. The five tribes participation in the Evaluation Facilitation of the Tribal Youth Program are Navajo Nation, Eastern Aleutian Tribes, Inc., Puyallup Tribes of Indians, Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, and Hannahville Indian Community.

CA/NCF

Project Summary for 2000-TY-FX-K001

The Tribal Youth Program (TYP) provides funds directly to tribal communities to develop programs that help prevent and control juvenile delinquency, including violent crime, and improve tribal juvenile justice systems. The Michigan Public Health Institute (MPHI) in Okemos, MI, in partnership with the Native American Institute at Michigan State University in Lansing, is assisting five tribes in developing capacity to evaluate the programs they have implemented with their TYP funds through the implementation of the Evaluation Facilitation for the Tribal Youth Program. Each site has assembled a program assessment team (PAT) that includes local stakeholders in developing and carrying out data collection, analysis activities, and evaluation reports. MPHI provides training and technical assistance to PATs to facilitate evaluations of their tribal programs. MPHI has analyzed each site's juvenile and tribal justice systems and TYP activities within those systems, and analyzed the relationships between the tribal government and county, State, and Federal government agencies as they relate to juvenile justice responsibilities and operations. The five tribes participation in the Evaluation Facilitation of the Tribal Youth Program are Navajo Nation, Eastern Aleutian Tribes, Inc., Puyallup Tribes of Indians, Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, and Hannahville Indian Community.

CA/NCF

The Tribal Youth Program (TYP) provides funds directly to tribal communities to develop programs that help prevent and control juvenile delinquency, including violent crime, and improve tribal juvenile justice systems. The Michigan Public Health Institute (MPHI) in Okemos, MI, in partnership with the Native American Institute at Michigan State University in Lansing, is assisting five tribes in developing capacity to evaluate the programs they have implemented with their TYP funds through the implementation of the Evaluation Facilitation for the Tribal Youth Program. Each site has assembled a program assessment team (PAT) that includes local stakeholders in developing and carrying out data collection, analysis activities, and evaluation reports. MPHI provides training and technical assistance to PATs to facilitate evaluations of their tribal programs. MPHI has analyzed each site's juvenile and tribal justice systems and TYP activities within those systems, and analyzed the relationships between the tribal government and county, State, and Federal government agencies as they relate to juvenile justice responsibilities and operations. The five tribes participation in the Evaluation Facilitation of the Tribal Youth Program are Navajo Nation, Eastern Aleutian Tribes, Inc., Puyallup Tribes of Indians, Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe, and Hannahville Indian Community.

CA/NCF

Date Created: July 18, 2000