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BUILDING STRONG NATIVE AMERICAN FAMILIES

Award Information

Award #
1997-WR-VX-K003
Location
Awardee County
Chippewa
Congressional District
Status
Closed
Funding First Awarded
1997
Total funding (to date)
$2,250,000

Description of original award (Fiscal Year 1997, $425,000)

Project Summary for 97-WR-VX-K003 (S-3)

This award provides funds to continue recipient development of their Safe Kids/Safe Streets program, a community-based initiative to reduce delinquency through prevention, reduction and effective response to child maltreatment and exposure to violence. Recipient has focused efforts on development and support of specific Tribal agencies, systems and cultural practices designed to strengthen members and their families. Primary strategies include: fostering collaboration among departments, agencies and individuals in the planning, operation and resourcing of services; engaging tribal members in planning and development; building capacity through professional training, development of protocols and processes, and services expansion; and creating data-driven, outcome-based decision making processes. Additionally a "Community Healing Process" that uses a train the trainer approach to strengthen family and community has been particularly effective and is being continued through this award.

ca/ncf

Safe Kids/Safe Streets is a research-based demonstration program that seeks to reduce juvenile delinquency by helping break the cycle of child and adolescent abuse and neglect. This demonstration program encourages localities to restructure and strengthen the criminal and juvenile justice systems to be more comprehensive and proactive in helping children and adolescents and their families who have been or are at risk of being abused and neglected. The program seeks to answer the question of whether a combination of systems reform, training, prevention education, data management and continuum of services strategies can measurably improve child safety and well being. The project is based on the Cycle of Violence research (conducted by Cathy Spatz Widom with funding from NIJ) that shows the association between early abuse and/or neglect as a child and later delinquency and criminality.

In the Sault Ste. Marie Nation, Safe Kids/Safe Streets is implemented as Building Strong Native American Families (BSNAF). Through BSNAF, the applicant will continue its work in the program's core areas of System Reform and Accountability, including training, Continuum of Services and Public Information/Prevention Education, while at the same time continuing to develop its capacity to address the Evaluation, Data Collection and Cross Agency Information Sharing components. Broad-based involvement of the community has been a critical strategy in system reform efforts. A mix of formal and informal leaders as well as strong community representation is critical to this community.

ca/ncf

Safe Kids/Safe Streets is a research-based demonstration program that seeks to reduce juvenile delinquency by helping break the cycle of child and adolescent abuse and neglect. This demonstration program encourages localities to restructure and strengthen the criminal and juvenile justice systems to be more comprehensive and proactive in helping children and adolescents and their families who have been or are at risk of being abused and neglected. The program seeks to answer the question of whether a combination of systems reform, training, prevention education, data management and continuum of services strategies can measurably improve child safety and well being. The project is based on the Cycle of Violence research (conducted by Cathy Spatz Widom with funding from NIJ) that shows the association between early abuse and/or neglect as a child and later delinquency and criminality.

In the Sault Ste. Marie Nation, Safe Kids/Safe Streets is implemented as Building Strong Native American Families (BSNAF). Through BSNAF, the applicant will continue its work in the program's core areas of System Reform and Accountability, including training, Continuum of Services and Public Information/Prevention Education, while at the same time continuing to develop its capacity to address the Evaluation, Data Collection and Cross Agency Information Sharing components. Broad-based involvement of the community has been a critical strategy in system reform efforts. A mix of formal and informal leaders as well as strong community representation is critical to this community.

ca/ncf

Safe Kids/Safe Streets is a research-based demonstration program that seeks to reduce juvenile delinquency by helping break the cycle of child and adolescent abuse and neglect. This demonstration program encourages localities to restructure and strengthen the criminal and juvenile justice systems to be more comprehensive and proactive in helping children and adolescents and their families who have been or are at risk of being abused and neglected. The program seeks to answer the question of whether a combination of systems reform, training, prevention education, data management and continuum of services strategies can measurably improve child safety and well being. The project is based on the Cycle of Violence research (conducted by Cathy Spatz Widom with funding from NIJ) that shows the association between early abuse and/or neglect as a child and later delinquency and criminality.

In the Sault Ste. Marie Nation, Safe Kids/Safe Streets is implemented as Building Strong Native American Families (BSNAF). Through BSNAF, the applicant will continue its work in the program's core areas of System Reform and Accountability, including training, Continuum of Services and Public Information/Prevention Education, while at the same time continuing to develop its capacity to address the Evaluation, Data Collection and Cross Agency Information Sharing components. Broad-based involvement of the community has been a critical strategy in system reform efforts. A mix of formal and informal leaders as well as strong community representation is critical to this community.

ca/ncf

Safe Kids/Safe Streets is a research-based demonstration program that seeks to reduce juvenile delinquency by helping break the cycle of child and adolescent abuse and neglect. This demonstration program encourages localities to restructure and strengthen the criminal and juvenile justice systems to be more comprehensive and proactive in helping children and adolescents and their families who have been or are at risk of being abused and neglected. The program seeks to answer the question of whether a combination of systems reform, training, prevention education, data management and continuum of services strategies can measurably improve child safety and well being. This demonstration project is based on the Cycle of Violence research (conducted by Cathy Spatz Widom with funding from NIJ) that shows the association between early abuse and/or neglect as a child and later delinquency and criminality. The program design and management structure was informed by an extensive series of focus groups, surveys and discussions with researchers and practitioners from across the nation and was vetted by the major bureaus and offices of OJP and DHHS.

In the Sault Ste. Marie Nation, Safe Kids/Safe Streets is implemented as Building Strong Native American Families (BSNAF). Through BSNAF, the applicant will continue its work in the program's core areas of System Reform and Accountability, including training, Continuum of Services and Public Information/Prevention Education, while at the same time continuing to develop its capacity to address the Evaluation, Data Collection and Cross Agency Information Sharing components. Broad-based involvement of the community has been a critical strategy in system reform efforts. A mix of formal and informal leaders as well as strong community representation is critical to this community. Additional strategies include: capacity expansion, which has been demonstrated in development of Treatment Teams with supported caseworkers and a juvenile officer; the Community Healing Process; the move to data based decision making, sharing of data sets and joint data collection; and fostering collaboration at all levels in the planning for and activities associated with improving services to children and families.

ca/ncf

Safe Kids/Safe Streets is a research-based demonstration program that seeks to reduce juvenile delinquency by helping break the cycle of child and adolescent abuse and neglect. This demonstration program encourages localities to restructure and strengthen the criminal and juvenile justice systems to be more comprehensive and proactive in helping children and adolescents and their families who have been or are at risk of being abused and neglected. The program seeks to answer the question of whether a combination of systems reform, training, prevention education, data management and continuum of services strategies can measurably improve child safety and well being. The project is based on the Cycle of Violence research (conducted by Cathy Spatz Widom with funding from NIJ) that shows the association between early abuse and/or neglect as a child and later delinquency and criminality.

In the Sault Ste. Marie Nation, Safe Kids/Safe Streets is implemented as Building Strong Native American Families (BSNAF). Through BSNAF, the applicant will continue its work in the program's core areas of System Reform and Accountability, including training, Continuum of Services and Public Information/Prevention Education, while at the same time continuing to develop its capacity to address the Evaluation, Data Collection and Cross Agency Information Sharing components. Broad-based involvement of the community has been a critical strategy in system reform efforts. A mix of formal and informal leaders as well as strong community representation is critical to this community.

ca/ncf

Date Created: June 5, 1997