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OJJDP News @ a Glance, November/December 2011

NCJ Number
236316
Date Published
Author(s)
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention
Publication Series
Annotation
This November/December 2011 newsletter of the U.S. Justice Department’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) highlights National Native American Heritage Month (November); OJJDP funding for fiscal year 2011 awards; the work of the National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence; six cities’ efforts to prevent youth violence; OJJDP’s release of the first publication in a series on school-related bullying; and information on upcoming events, as well as “other news” in brief and annotations for new publications.
Abstract
On November 1, 2011, President Obama called on all Americans to commemorate National Native American Heritage Month with programs and activities that honor the traditions, culture, and history of American Indians. In fiscal year 2011, OJJDP awarded $393 million in grants to help at-risk youth, protect children, and improve juvenile justice systems nationwide. The Attorney General’s National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence held its first public hearing on November 29 and 30, 2011. The hearing - one of four to be held across the country in the coming year - featured testimony from practitioners, policymakers, academics, and community members regarding the problem of children’s exposure to violence. In a working session of the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention on October 31-November 1, 2011, teams from six cities met with Federal agencies to share information and experience about evidence-based practices for preventing youth and gang violence and to help formerly incarcerated youth successfully reenter their communities. The first in a series of publications on school-related bullying surveyed 1,000 students in the fall and spring of their sixth-grade year in order to determine the links, if any, between being victimized by bullying, being engaged in school, and the outcome reflected in school records of attendance and achievement.
Date Created: October 2, 2019