U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government, Department of Justice.

Dot gov

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

Https

The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

National Gang Center Newsletter, Summer 2016

NCJ Number
250141
Date Published
Author(s)
National Gang Center
Annotation
This Summer 2016 issue of the National Gang Center Newsletter contains feature articles on gang tattoos, partnerships between businesses and youth job-training programs, a webinar on law enforcement cooperation with street outreach workers who deal with gang members, and a plan for program sustainability.
Abstract
“Gang Tattoos” discusses tattoos as a symbol of belonging to a particular gang, which communicates to others that the wearer belongs to the gang, has the gang’s protection, and is committed to the gang’s behavioral norms. Tattoo characteristics (gang acronym, numbers, symbols or pictures, and placement) are discussed. Tattoos for particular well-known gangs are described, and the use of gang tattoo removal is discussed. “Partnerships for Success: A Synergy Between Business and Youth Job-Training Programs” presents a rationale for businesses and youth job-training programs to cooperate in establishing formal agreements that facilitate placing youth in work positions for which they have received training. An innovative exemplary job-training program in Newport News, VA, is described. “Street Outreach and Law Enforcement Collaboration: Prioritizing Safety When Working With Gang Members” reports on a webinar, which featured a collaboration between the Houston Mayor’s Anti-Gang Office and the Houston Police Department in developing constructive relationships and establishing clear communication protocols among outreach staff, police, schools, and justice systems to ensure an effective crisis response when addressing gang-related conflicts and violence. “A Plan for Program Sustainability” addresses how to sustain a grant-funded program once funding is no longer available. This issue of the Newsletter also provides an update on 2015 gang legislation.
Date Created: July 28, 2016